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Zc(3900) is on the top of the "Highlights of the Year" Quarks come in twos and threes—or so nearly every experiment has told us. This summer, the BESIII Collaboration in China and the Belle Collaboration in Japan reported they had sorted through the debris of high-energy electron-positron collisions and seen a mysterious particle that appeared to contain four quarks. Though other explanations for the nature of the particle, dubbed Zc(3900), are possible, the “tetraquark” interpretation may be gaining traction: BESIII has since seen a series of other particles that appear to contain four quarks.
Observation of a charged charmoniumlike structure at BESIII An international team of scientists that operate the BESIII Experiment at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider in China recently began a series of specialized studies aiming at an understanding of the anomalous "Y(4260)" particle. As a striking and unexpected first observation from these new studies, the collaboration has reported that the Y(4260) particle in fact decays to a new, and perhaps even more mysterious, particle that they named the "Zc(3900).”